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2020 Rookie Triathlon Opens Registration

Planning begins as 2020 Rookie Triathlon opens registration

Triathlete crosses the 2019 Rookie Triathlon finish line. Registration for 2020 Rookie Triathlon opens on September 27, 2019.

Rookie Kay Lynn crosses the 2019 Rookie Tri finish line! Credit – Tom Marek

2020 Rookie Triathlon opens registration at the Kerrville Triathlon expo. The 17th annual Rookie Triathlon will take place on Sunday, May 3rd, at Walter E. Long Metropolitan Park in northeast Austin. In May 2019, more than 1000 participants completed the first triathlon of their life or the first triathlon of their season. 2020 Rookie Triathlon’s best pricing is available until Tuesday, Oct. 22nd.

“For the last 16 years, thousands of athletes have become triathletes by crossing their first finish line at Rookie Tri,” said Stacy Keese, co-owner of High Five Events. “We know Year 17 will be the same, people making Rookie Tri the first tri of their life or the first tri of their season.”

For 16 years, thousands have made this beloved event their first triathlon

2020 Rookie Triathlon has three different divisions: Rookie (first or second triathlon ever), Veteran (completed more than two triathlons), and Open. Rookies and Veterans start the swim in their division based on their age group. Two participants enter the water every few seconds. The Open Division allows participants to begin regardless of age, with a mass swim start. Rookie Tri also features Athena and Clydesdale categories. Triathletes who can’t make it to the event can still participate through the virtual Rookie Tri. Participants can complete the virtual 2020 Rookie Triathlon on their own time at their preferred locations.

Participants will receive custom 2020 participant shirts, finisher medals, water bottles, and swim caps. After the race, everyone can enjoy the beer garden (21+), a post-race meal, and the signature swag toss. Professional timing and photography, as well as a great volunteer crew and hundreds of supportive spectators, will make this triathlon memorable for rookies and veterans alike. 

Rookie Tri, an award-winning triathlon, consists of a 300m swim in Decker Lake, an 11.2-mile bike ride in a protected lane around the lake, and a two-mile run through Walter E. Long Metropolitan Park. Rookie Tri has aquabike and relay options for race day. The relay team can consist of two or three members and the aquabike completes the swim and the bike only. 

Tips to Make Sure You Have The Correct Fit for Your Helmet

For a bike helmet to protect you correctly, you need to purchase one that fits you properly. Keep reading for tips to make sure you have the correct fit for your helmet. 

To make sure you’re getting the most out of your helmet, you need to find one that fits you best in all the following ways. Use these tips on how to make sure you have the right fit for your bike helmet. 

Size

tips to get the perfect fit for your bike helmet

A great example of how a helmet should sit on your head with the proper fit!

The first thing you should adjust when choosing a helmet is the fit pads or adjuster ring. The helmet needs to be snug around your head to effectively protect you. It should not be too tight where you feel pressure, and not too loose that there is any wiggle room. If needed, add more fit pads to get a secure fit. If your helmet has an adjuster ring, modify the circumference until the helmet is fitted properly for your head. 

Height

The next thing to determine is how high the helmet should sit on your head to protect your head on all sides, in case of a fall. It should sit somewhat low on your head, leaving only one to two finger-widths visible on your forehead. You can also decide if your helmet fits properly by looking up. You should be able to see them rim or front edge of the helmet when you do so without interfering with your vision. Pro tip: you should always wear protective lenses with your helmet, so make sure there is enough room to wear them both comfortably.

Straps

The straps of this bike helmet fit perfectly

A perfect view of how your helmet’s chin straps should fit

To keep the helmet in place, the next step is ensuring the chin straps are long enough to reach under your chin and can be tightened securely. This part is especially important because you do not want to be dealing with an ill-fitting helmet during your next tri. The “Y” shaped strap needs to fit under your ears comfortably and buckle under your chin without being too tight. Your helmet should not be able to move more than an inch in any direction. After you buckle the chin strap, it should be secured in the correct position. 

Remember: bicycle helmets only work if you wear them correctly. If you’re riding alone or going on a group ride, use these tips when shopping around for your next helmet to make sure you are as safe as possible on your future rides.

Remembering Her First Triathlon

Amanda Lovato recalls experiences from her first triathlon

Former professional triathlete, Amanda Lovato, provides some insight to her first triathlon. See her thought process as she took on her first triathlon. Keep this in mind as you train for Rookie Tri, the first triathlon of your life, everyone starts in the same exact spot!

An Athlete’s Perspective – Issue 17

by: Amanda Lovato

Even pro triathletes have to start somewhere. This is how I started…

I needed a goal. I was chubby, unhealthy, unhappy, and only 25 years old. Being athletic in my high school and college career, I realized I needed to try something new to help me focus on being healthy again. After a lot of consideration, I signed up for my first triathlon in February 1997.

That February, I made a commitment to compete in the St. Anthony’s Triathlon in Tampa, Florida, only two months after my “start to train” date. I did this purposely. I needed a goal that wasn’t too far in advance. But I also needed to make sure that I stayed on task with my training and my goals.

Image result for amanda lovato triathleteCoach

The first thing I did was hire a coach. I knew I needed some assistance in learning the “ropes” of triathlon. I had never swum in my life. I mean I could possibly save myself if I had a life preserver strapped on, however, I didn’t know proper technique. My coach invited me to join the masters swim program. After day one, I was hooked. I’m not sure exactly why as I look back on that fateful day. I was splashing around in a cold pool at 5:30 in the morning. I was kicked. I was yelled at. I nearly drowned. I didn’t know anything about pool etiquette. In fact, before workout that morning, I informed coach that I could swim 1500 meters in 19 minutes. I believed this because at the time my college boyfriend swam a 15:39 in the 1500 at the Olympics. In my mind, 19 minutes was equivalent to a 10-12 minute mile on the track. I was SO WRONG! Nevertheless, my coach helped me to believe that I could actually finish a triathlon.

Training

I trained so hard leading up to the race that I was very tired every single day. I celebrated my days off on Mondays! As the day of the race quickly approached, I was more nervous than ever. However, I was determined. I was determined to race as hard as I could. And I was determined to finish! Coach and I talked about everything before I left for Tampa (from Baltimore). He encouraged me to have a bike shop look over my bike before I raced. He told me what time to eat the morning of the race, as well as what to eat. He told me exactly what sort of times I should be expecting for each segment. I felt very encouraged to have this much support. As I arrived, I followed everything he told me to the “T.” However, I do wish he had told me to not eat a huge steak the night before the race. That was definitely a rookie mistake!

Swim

As the gun went off, my heart nearly stopped! But then my competitive juices took over and the feelings of being scared and nervous disappeared! I was in the mix of all of the kicking and scratching for an entire 30 seconds before everyone seemed to disappear. I was alone – swimming along for 1500 meters. I kept on encouraging myself to keep going. I could do it! It took me 36 minutes to swim the distance – I did it! Now off for the bike!

Image result for amanda lovato triathleteBike

The bike seemed to be the most effortless of all. I loved the feeling of going fast. I could really push myself! Unlike the swim, I could work really hard and feel like I was going somewhere. I was pushing as hard as I could possibly go!

Run

As I entered the second transition, I knew that I had the run in the bag! What I didn’t anticipate, however, is what my legs would feel like after getting off the bike after riding so hard. I hadn’t pushed myself to the limit on the bike like that, so when I got off I just wanted to lay down! I was so tired! Through the run I lumbered, I struggled, I walked, but I worked as hard as I could to finish. My run time (for the 10K) was 55 minutes! I was ecstatic! I had finished my very first triathlon! I was absolutely hooked!!!

I never would have thought that 11 years later I would be doing this as a professional and telling the story of how I first started. It just goes to show that if you put your mind to something and if you make goals for yourself, you can do anything! Go for your dreams!

An Athlete’s Perspective is a blog series of event and/or training experiences written firsthand by the athletes themselves. An Athlete’s Perspective is a completely unscripted and raw look into the mind and daily life of an athlete as they prepare for their next race. Readers will discover training regimens, eating tips, gear recommendations, and an uncut perspective into the lives of people like you and me.

My First Triathlon – Dead Last, Still a Winner

Experiences from your first triathlon

We put out a challenge on Rookie Tri Facebook for triathletes to submit a story about their first triathlon. The goal was to show individuals thinking about completing Rookie Triathlon as their first that they can make it happen! As with anything in life, the first time you do something doesn’t normally end of perfectly. Cindy Miller shared her story and all of its ups and downs. This won’t be your exact experience. With training and determination, you will complete your first triathlon too. Remember – whether you’re first or last, you’ll still be a triathlete when you cross the finish line on Sunday, May 5th.

An Athlete’s Perspective – Issue 16

by: Cindy Miller

I have completed five sprint triathlons. I am not an athlete but do like to push myself to try new things. This story is not meant to scare you, but to encourage you and give you a little chuckle. The triathlon I describe in this story is longer than the Rookie Triathlon. Anyone can do the Rookie Tri with a little effort and a lot of determination.

Preparation

My first triathlon was Spring Lake Sprint Triathlon at Aquarena Springs. I signed up and was doing it all by myself. My first bike was a hybrid road/mountain bike that I purchased from Walmart for $200 (mistake #1). I practiced my open water in Lake Austin. Most of my cycling was done on a stationary bike. I had already run several half marathons so the 5k was going to be a piece of cake. My sister was going to go with me for support and help me any way she could. I was extremely nervous and excited.

Here we go!

We arrived early to set up my transition station and I realized I could not wear my glasses in the water. I could not see to get from the transition point to the beginning of the swim. This was the first time my sister came in to save the day. She guided me to the swim start area and I was good to go. Again, excited and nervous I dove off the dock into the water and to my surprise there were several diver photographers there to startle me. I kept swimming and enjoying the fish and plant growth below me. The 500-meter swim was complete and I went to my transition point. I put on my glasses, dried off, put on my socks, shoes, my shirt, and walked my bike out of the transition.

The bike ride

Still full of excitement and a bit tired from the swim and transition, I started my 14-mile bike ride. It was lovely. Most of the other athletes were very kind as they passed me. Hearing things like, “on your left” or encouraging comments like  “keep it up!!” or “you got this!!” All was well until a police officer said, “Your back tire looks a little low.” He was correct. Being my first tri, I did not come prepared for a low tire (mistake #2) but that wasn’t going to stop me. I kept on going, dragging myself downhill. I watched a bus pass me and saw the volunteers get picked up right in front of me.

My sister was at the transition waiting for me to return with my bike and heard a volunteer say, “all the cyclists are back.” She went up to the volunteer and said, “wait, my sister is still out there.” She was nervous for me as they already started announcing the winners.

Not alone

I was still riding my bike and thought I was all alone, but I wasn’t. There were two SUVs behind me making sure I was safe. One came up to me and asked if I wanted to quit and I said “no” but I could use a pump. He hesitated because it was against the rules, but at this point, it was not about winning just about finishing. He pumped up my tire and I finished the ride.

I just had the run to go. The kind man that followed me in the SUV for the final three miles of my bike ride said that he needed to come with me for the run since there was no one else out there. He mentioned that he couldn’t run fast so we had a nice 3.1-mile jog.

Finale

My sister was now waiting for me to cross the finish line. Most of the triathletes were gone so the main volunteers asked my sister if the volunteers that were timing me could leave and she said it was fine. Knowing that my race time was not anyone’s concern at that point, just crossing the finish line.

I finally crossed the finish line with my jogging partner and my first triathlon was complete. My sister was there to congratulate me. If you haven’t guessed by now, I came in dead last. I was not defeated. My first triathlon was complete.  My sister and I laughed the whole ride home. I learned several things from that experience:

1)      My sister is wonderful

2)      No matter what I was safe

3)      Someone’s always going to be last (stick around to cheer that person on)

4)      Never give up!

An Athlete’s Perspective is a blog series of event and/or training experiences written firsthand by the athletes themselves. An Athlete’s Perspective is a completely unscripted and raw look into the mind and daily life of an athlete as they prepare for their next race. Readers will discover training regimens, eating tips, gear recommendations, and an uncut perspective into the lives of people like you and me.

Professional Swim Advice for Rookie Triathletes

Complete at least one open water swim before Rookie Triathlon

Hundreds of Rookies will complete their first triathlon at Rookie Triathlon on Sunday, May 6th. If you’re training for your first triathlon like William, then you’ve probably never completed an open water swim. Perhaps all of your training has taken place in the pool. Until Tuesday, April 24th, all of William’s swim training has taken place in the pool. Check in with his training and see how his open water swims went. Paul “Barny” Williams, William’s coach and professional triathlete, provides some advice and talks about the importance of completing at least one open water swim before race day. Watch the video below and feel free to share the advice with your Rookie friends!

Beginner Triathlon Gear Shopping Check List

Must Have Beginner Triathlon Gear

These are the essential items you will need to get you from the start to finish of your first triathlon

Beginner Triathlon Bike - The Rookie Tri triathlon gearBike

Any Bike. It can be anything from your uncle’s old bike that has been in the garage or the mountain bike you take out riding with your kids. Now, be sure that the bike is in good repair by taking it to a local shop. Sometimes if the bike is really old or in disrepair, you may spend just as much on fixing it up as you will a beginner bike. A second note is that a road bike and bike with gears will make your triathlon journey a lot more comfortable.  You will be able to go further with less effort and will have more “in the tank” when you head out for a run.

Beginner Triathlon Helmet- The Rookie Tri triathlon gear

Helmet

Helmets should be replaced every 5-8 years and definitely after any crash– no matter how small. Helmets are the same safety level at any price tag so there is no need to open up the wallet for the cool $300 ones. These higher end helmets will be equipped with more ventilation and more aerodynamics. Some helmets do come is sized so make sure and check when you purchase. A loose fitting helmet is not safe.

Beginner Triathlon Tri Shorts- The Rookie Tri triathlon gear

Bike or Tri Shorts

Really you can wear what you want, just remember that transition is open and there is nowhere to change in private. If you want to be comfortable while training and racing, You will want a nice pair of athletic shorts. First, these can really be anything but cotton, as cotton will not wick away water and can lead to chaffing, ouch! A basic tri short with a little bit of padding will make your bike-riding experience much more enjoyable. The best part is that these shorts will last long after your triathlon debut. They are perfect for cross training, cycle classes, and even going for runs.

Beginner Triathlon Goggles - The Rookie Tri triathlon gear

Goggles

Most importantly, there is no perfect goggle since everyone’s face is shaped a little different. Visit a local swim shop and try on a few models to find what works for you. Leaky goggles will derail your swim and can make swimming a lot more difficult if you are having to stop and constantly adjust for goggles, therefore don’t skimp and just buy the cheapest ones at the store. Once you have tested them out a few times, we suggest buying a second pair in a different tint so that you have something for all conditions.

Beginner Triathlon Running shoes for triathlon gear

Running Shoes

If they are comfortable, they are good to go. Even if they are just the shoes you got because you liked the way they looked. Have some shoes that aren’t comfortable? Well, you can still run in those — you will just be, well uncomfortable at the end of your run. 🙂

beginner triathlon sports bra- triathlon gear

Sports Bra

Ladies, even if you decide to use your swimsuit for your first triathlon you are going to want to wear a good sports bra underneath. You will want something you are comfortable running in. If you have some areas that run, like under the armpits you can put some Vaseline or Body Glide on in the morning to help with chaffing.

Also Recommended:

  • Flat Kit
  • Hat/Visor
  • Water Bottle for the Bike
  • Bright Towel for Transition
  • Sunscreen
  • Race belt

Totally Optional:

  • Socks
  • Bike Shoes with clip-in pedals
  • Sports Watch
  • Sunglasses
  • Transition Bag
  • Wetsuit

 

 

4 Ways to Expand Your Triathlon Training

Training for a triathlon might feel a bit overwhelming, but you’re not alone and we’re here to help! Below you’ll find 4 ways to expand your training and make some friends along the way.

Austin Tri Club- Beginner Triathlon Training Group

Austin Tri Club bike ride.

1. Join the Austin Tri Club!

Austin Triathlon Club is an all-volunteer, member-run community of triathletes across the Austin area. Club dues are only $40/year. Yes, you read that right! Member benefits are plentiful and include new triathlete mentoring, club workouts, monthly happy hours, and a welcoming group that’ll help you achieve your goals!

2. Run and Bike with Austin Duathletes

Austin Duathletes is a fun and FREE group with runs and bike rides throughout the year. They have a standing Monday Morning Run at 5:45 with 3 and 5-mile routes, as well as other special events. You can join them on March 24th for a bike ride on Walnut Creek Trail with 20 and 30-mile options. Wheels down from Tamale House on E. 6th Street at 8 a.m. Follow their Facebook page, just show up, or email the Duathlete leader, Panther, to get more involved.

Austin Duathletes Run and Bike Training Group

3. Join The Rookie Tri Facebook Group!

This group is a place for Rookie Participants, Veterans, and those who are just interested in triathlon, to share support, advice, training adventures, and friendship. Join the group to share your stories, pictures, and wisdom! There is even more useful information on triathlon training at mastersoftri.com if you’re interested.

4. Join Bicycle World on March 24-25th with their beginner triathlon training weekend.

The weekend will include bike and run workouts as well as workshops. Workshops include How to prepare and what to expect on race day for your First Triathlon, General Tips for each swim, bike and run, and basic maintenance of gear. There will also be an in-store guide to gear selection where you can see what you might be missing in your triathlon gear as well as an open Q&A session.

While triathlon is seen as an individual sport you do not have to train alone. There are groups to join that are both online and in town. Happy Training!