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Rookie Triathlete: Part 1: A Work in Progress

Hi, my name is William. I’m a Rookie.

What started off as a small idea has now taken on a life of its own. I’m committing to my first triathlon, The Rookie Triathlon on May 6, 2018. My world-class/uber-talented triathlon coach is none other than Paul “Barny” Matthews. I have no tri kit. My only swim gear is a pair of swim goggles. I’ve never swum for an extended period of time. I don’t have a bike, I don’t even have a helmet. I haven’t biked for 15+ minutes since I was a kid 20+ years ago. But I do have all the running stuff I’ll need! There it is, the silver lining.

Paul “Barny” Matthews at 2017 Rookie Tri (credit: Ed Sparks)

Quick background, my name is William Dyson. I’m a runner. I love to be in the water. I can ride a bike. I’m also the Communications Manager for High Five Events and have been so for nearly two years now. I’ve never committed to a triathlon. Until now…

This blog will provide updates on my training progress, my research into the sport, and insight from Barny as to why he’s having me train the way he is. So let’s kick things off! My training starts this Friday, 2/2, at Barton Springs. I will complete (fingers crossed) a mock Rookie Tri (300m swim, 11-mile bike ride, 2-mile run) on Friday, Feb. 2nd, to create a database that I can use for training purposes and compare and contrast my (hopeful) progress (time, weight, measurements, etc). For updates, stay tuned to this blog, follow us on Twitter (@stay_vertical #feelthebarn @paulbarny), and check out Barny’s coaching website!

If it weren’t for my running gear I would have NOTHING needed to compete in a triathlon. So what am I doing about that? I’m leaning on triathletes, asking them questions. I have co-workers who’ve competed in many triathlons, including Kona. They’re helping establish my knowledge base.

Felt Z100

I’ve researched bikes. I’ve been in touch with Josh from Jack & Adam’s Fredericksburg about a Felt Z100 (hope I wrote that correctly). My thinking behind buying a bike as opposed to renting/borrowing one, I’d like to start riding to work to conserve on gas and mileage on my truck. Josh put together a ~$700 package that includes the bike, a helmet, flat kit, tube, and flat pedals (since I won’t get the clip pedals and the bike shoes needed for those pedals (aka more money). I haven’t bought it yet, but I’m leaning towards this route for my introduction.

My total swim gear consists of one pair of swimming goggles. Sounds like I should acquire some more gear before May 6th. When I complete my mock Rookie Tri it’ll be done in running tights and boardshorts. I’ll wear goggles too, but I don’t think I’ll wear a swim cap or any shirt. The forecast calls for chilly temperatures so I might rethink the top part and wear an Under Armour shirt. Full disclosure: I hold my nose when I jump in a body of water.

Like I said, I’m a runner. I have all I’ll need. My only real focus for the two-mile run is speed. I know you can’t make up much time on a short course, but I want to nail the Rookie Tri run course.

My first meeting with Barny took place on Jan. 26th. His father was visiting from Australia, fresh off a blistering time at 3M Half Marathon, and joined the meeting. Gerry’s advice helped establish my base as well. He mentioned triathlon training is just like any other training: make sure you control what you can control. Barny reminded me not to panic (yeah right) because there was a lot of time between now and race day. Focus on getting better, continuing to show progress.

That’s it until next week. I’ll provide a recap a the mock Rookie Tri, show my results, chat about next steps, and provide any other updates. If you’re like me and have never completed a triathlon, I hope this blog gives you the nudge needed to join me on race day. If you want to watch me transition out of the bed of my truck and pedal 11 miles on a cruiser with a helmet that’s a size too small, join us at 7:30 a.m. on Friday, Feb. 2nd, at Barton Springs!

Four Simple Steps to Clean Your Bike

Sweat, dirt, grime. Over time, these can do serious damage to your bike. Clean your bike between tune-ups to keep all of your moving parts working optimally. This is especially true if you are going for longer rides, are a heavy sweater, or if you ride in the rain.

Clean your bike and it’ll make your next ride feel better while prolonging the life of your bike parts.

Supplies to clean your bike

  • Rag – at least three; two that can get greasy and one to dry off and polish the bike after it is clean
  • Brushes – one soft and a smaller stiff brush for the drivetrain
  • Water Bucket
  • Cleaner – Simple Green is a great general cleaner to use for overall cleaning of the bike
  • Bike Degreaser – get one that’s specific to bikes, not just turpentine
  • Chain Lube – there are a lot of options here and what you want to use may vary. Talk to your local bike shop about what might be best. When in doubt, go for a light, self-cleaning lubricant.

1. Washing the frame

Use a soft cloth or brush to clean the entirety of your bike frame, including the front fork and handlebars. Work from the top down. Finish by scrubbing the chainstays, cranks, and cogs. Let sit for a minute. Then rinse all of the parts in the same order you cleaned them.

2. Cleaning the drive chain

Depending on how often you clean your bike this can get really messy.

Apply degreaser to the chain, cassette, and derailleurs. Let that sit and then scrub with a hard-bristle brush. Run through all of the gears to make sure each section has been covered in degreaser. Rinse thoroughly and then repeat if needed. You should be able to wipe a clean cloth along your chain with little to no residue showing.

3. Let your bike dry completely

Kinda self-explanatory. You can use a clean cloth to wipe down the frame so that water spots don’t show after.

4. Lube the chain

Once your bike is dry it is important to lube your chain. You lube the chain by holding the bottle and steadily dripping it onto the chain while turning the pedals backward. It should not take more than a few drops. Run through all of the gears. You should be able to run your fingers along the chain and have little-to-no residue on your fingers. An over-lubed chain will just attract more dirt.

 

6 Items To Check Before Race Day

Make sure and check your gear before an event. Training can put wear and tear on important items. Here is a good check list to follow

1. Goggles: Make sure you have used them recently and that the eye seals have not perished and leak water. Check that the strap and nose piece aren’t brittle and are securely attached. Make sure the lenses aren’t scratched. If your goggles have any of these issues, consider replacing them and bringing them as back-ups to your new ones.

2. Wetsuit: Check for potential tears and frayed seams. Look for holes and cuts; these can be patched and glued to prevent water entering the suit. Jack & Adam’s can help you decide if the suit can be repaired. Wetsuits aren’t required, so don’t worry if you don’t have one.

3. Bike: Make sure that the bike frame has no cracks, the wheels are not bent, and that all components are in working condition including brakes and shifters. If you do not know how to check for these things, don’t worry – just call ahead to your local bike store and ask them to safety check it. This can also be a great opportunity to learn how to check the bike yourself. On race morning, make sure tires are inflated properly.

4. Helmet: The plastic shell needs to be firmly affixed to the foam and the strap should not be frayed. There should be no cracks or dents as these will likely not pass inspection when checking into transition. It should fit snugly around your head. The general rule for the chin strap is within two fingers spaces from the chin.

5. Cycling Shoes & Pedals: Make sure that the cleat is firmly attached to the bottom of the shoe. Replace cleat if it is worn down and may inhibit safe clipping in. Check and make sure pedals are firmly attached to the crank.

6: Running Shoes: Look to see that they are not worn out of alignment or that the midsole is crushed. Cut down or replace any long or frayed shoe laces. If using elastic laces make sure that have not lost elasticity and that any plastic is still in good working condition

My First Triathlon

My First Tri

by Jack Murray, Owner of Jack & Adam’s Bicycles, Bicycle World, & High Five Events

Almost every day customers visit our shop seeking advice on participating in their first triathlon. When I have the opportunity to help someone in this situation, I share with them the story of my first tri in hopes of helping them feel more comfortable about their endeavor.

It was the summer of 1994. The event was the Victoria Splash & Dash in Victoria, Texas. I had trained for a few weeks and was sure I was in peak condition for an easy victory. I was, after all, fresh off a 1600 meter run victory and bronze in the 3200 at the Texas State Championship Relays. How hard could a little tri be? I thought I knew all there was to know about swimming, biking, and running. Turns out – I knew nothing!

The morning started with me loading my bike into the trunk of my mom’s car and driving with her and my sister to the event one hour away. I arrived around 6 AM for an 8 AM start. This was before on-line registration, so I registered for the event that morning and picked up my packet. As people started to arrive, I noticed the differences between my rusty old mountain bike and some of their $2000 race machines. My confidence, however, was not crushed; I was still sure I could win. After racking my bike, I headed over to the pool area where everyone was warming up. As I got closer, I noticed everyone was wearing tight swimsuits and goggles. I was sure, however, that my baggy Umbro “soccer shorts” and lack of goggles was the best way to go. My plan was simple – go as fast as I could for as long as I could.

They were letting swimmers go every 5 seconds and we had to snake up and down the pool for a total of 300 meters. I patiently waited in line until 5,4,3,2,1 go, I was off. I swam as fast as I could to the other side and then back again. 50 meters down 250 to go.

By 150 my arms started to hurt and my eyes were stinging from the chlorine. By 200 I was kicking off the bottom every few strokes and swimming with my eyes closed, by 250 I was just trying to get out of the water alive, and without my shorts falling off. After the swim, I was sure I was still in good position to hold my own on the bike.

I grab my bike out of transition and head out on to the 12 mile course. As I start to ride I realize I am not catching anyone. The rusty, old mountain bike that I borrowed from my high school track coach was not the stallion I thought it was. Riding around the block a few times for training was probably not the riding that all these people were doing. The fact that my bike could not shift was more trouble than I thought it would be. And looking back, my saddle was also about 5 to 7 inches to low. Towards the end of the ride I was being passed by a 10 year old girl and her mom; it was then that I started to feel my big victory slipping away. Still I was determined to blaze through transition and light up the run.

Transition to the run was probably my most memorable moment. As I speed to the transition area, volunteers are yelling at me to dismount my bike. As I go to lift my feet off the pedals, I forget that they are hooked in by cages. The combination of speed and my feet getting caught was enough to send me crashing like a bowling ball into a bike rack with about 6 bikes on it. The volunteers quickly help me up and as I throw my bike in the grass next to a picnic table (the rack was down), I remember thinking how much fun I was having. The whole day was something I had never experienced before.

It took about a mile into the run before I got my legs out of bike riding mode. I had no idea how riding a bike would effect legs on the run. As I rounded the final stretch I saw all these happy people cheering for me, eating, drinking, and just having a good time. I talked to people for about an hour. I met a guy my age that had been doing triathlons for years. I met some members of the Corpus Christi tri club and was invited to their next meeting. I signed up for their monthly newsletter. In short – I was hooked. It was nothing I thought it would be. It was fun and I discovered a whole different type of people that did not exist in my 5000 person hometown.

Through the years of collegiate running, duathlons, sprint tri’s, half Ironman events, Ironman events, and working in the shop, my first tri memory will forever help me keep our sport in perspective. It is not about where you finish, what type of bike you have, what you do for a living, where you are from or where you are going. It is about having fun and that is it. You can have many goals in our sport without forgetting this key element. I am constantly reminded of this by some of the greatest in the sport like Michael Lovato and James Bonney. If you ask either of them why they have dedicated and built their lives around this sport, they will tell you the same.