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Tips to Make Sure You Have The Correct Fit for Your Helmet

For a bike helmet to protect you correctly, you need to purchase one that fits you properly. Keep reading for tips to make sure you have the correct fit for your helmet. 

To make sure you’re getting the most out of your helmet, you need to find one that fits you best in all the following ways. Use these tips on how to make sure you have the right fit for your bike helmet. 

Size

tips to get the perfect fit for your bike helmet

A great example of how a helmet should sit on your head with the proper fit!

The first thing you should adjust when choosing a helmet is the fit pads or adjuster ring. The helmet needs to be snug around your head to effectively protect you. It should not be too tight where you feel pressure, and not too loose that there is any wiggle room. If needed, add more fit pads to get a secure fit. If your helmet has an adjuster ring, modify the circumference until the helmet is fitted properly for your head. 

Height

The next thing to determine is how high the helmet should sit on your head to protect your head on all sides, in case of a fall. It should sit somewhat low on your head, leaving only one to two finger-widths visible on your forehead. You can also decide if your helmet fits properly by looking up. You should be able to see them rim or front edge of the helmet when you do so without interfering with your vision. Pro tip: you should always wear protective lenses with your helmet, so make sure there is enough room to wear them both comfortably.

Straps

The straps of this bike helmet fit perfectly

A perfect view of how your helmet’s chin straps should fit

To keep the helmet in place, the next step is ensuring the chin straps are long enough to reach under your chin and can be tightened securely. This part is especially important because you do not want to be dealing with an ill-fitting helmet during your next tri. The “Y” shaped strap needs to fit under your ears comfortably and buckle under your chin without being too tight. Your helmet should not be able to move more than an inch in any direction. After you buckle the chin strap, it should be secured in the correct position. 

Remember: bicycle helmets only work if you wear them correctly. If you’re riding alone or going on a group ride, use these tips when shopping around for your next helmet to make sure you are as safe as possible on your future rides.

Group Riding Guidelines to Follow

Make sure you and your crew follow these group riding guidelines on your next ride

Group riding provides cyclists with many benefits: exercise, training, support from other cyclists, and safety. Whether you’re riding to lunch with co-workers or training on the Rookie Tri bike course with your crew, the following group riding guidelines will come in handy. Knowing these basic guidelines will also make the ride more enjoyable and safer for the group.

  • Wear a helmet for safety (and be a good model for children)
  • Complete a quick, pre-ride safety check
  • Obey all traffic laws
  • Operate bike in such a manner as to not offend or endanger motorists, pedestrians, etc.
  • Turn on all lights on bikes
  • Wear reflective gear that makes the group more visible, even in the daytime
  • Ride single file except in areas where it is safe to ride side-by-side (three or more riders should never be next to one another)
  • When riding in a pack, look at “shoulder level” of cyclists in front of you. This allows you to see what is happening further up the road and not focus on the cyclists in front of you. Fixing your gaze on the back tire of the person in front of you doesn’t give you enough time to react should the entire group slow down.
  • It is the responsibility of the lead rider to notify the cyclist behind them of approaching issues by saying, “jogger up, cyclist up.” This includes any potential danger that may lie ahead. It is the responsibility of each cyclist to pass the caution back to the person behind them.

Important hand signals

Hand signals, instead of words, are used to warn riders of potential danger on the roadway. In a pack, oftentimes, the only cyclist who has enough visual warning is the front cyclist. Therefore, it is the responsibility of the lead rider to warn the cyclists behind them. If the lead cyclist (or the cyclist in front of you):

  • shakes their hand to the right = there’s a pothole, branch, or some obstacle to the right
  • shakes their hand to the left = there’s an obstacle to the left
  • puts hand behind their posterior = follow right behind them as there might be obstacles on both sides
  • puts right hand down with the flat of the hand facing you = lead cyclist is slowing down or coming to a stop

Avoid slowing down abruptly or making any other sudden moves. Ask experienced riders questions when you’re not sure what is occurring.