Understanding Brake Issues

Become knowledgeable about brake issues with this advice

Having brake issues? If so, you might be able to identify the problem yourself. There are three main reasons brake levers typically malfunction:

  • Your brake pads are not close enough to the rims
  • The system is not tight or fully “engaged”
  • Your levers are damaged or dirty

Always check that your brake pads are close enough to your wheel rims. Before you reposition them, check that the pads are not too worn down. Replace the pads if needed.

If the pads are okay, then turn the cable adjustment knob counterclockwise until the desired pad-to-rim distance is achieved (1/8th of an inch is standard). The cable adjustment knob is located either where your brake cable enters your lever or on the brake caliper.

Most modern braking systems have a quick-release mechanism that allows you to loosen the cable system without affecting your brakes effectiveness. This is the “slack” in the system needed to open the brake arms wide enough to get your wheel out. Some quick-releases are located on brake assemblies. Others are located on brake levers or elsewhere along the cable route. If you find too much “slack” in your braking system, check these quick-release mechanisms first to make sure they are engaged properly.

You may need to clean or repair the brake levers if your brake quick-releases are connected properly but the levers function poorly.

If you’re still having brake issues contact James Balentine of City Limit Cycles. You can schedule an appointment and he’ll make repairs at your home or office!

3 Riding Quotes That’ll Get You Back in the Saddle

Riding quotes to reignite your flame

The weather. Work got busier. Kids are sick. Your bike needs a tune-up. Recovering from injury. Whatever the reason, you haven’t been riding lately. These 3 riding quotes will get you back in the saddle in no time (unless you’re injured, get better first). Go for a quick ride on one of these three routes or get your friends together for a group ride. Just get the wind blowing in your face again. You’ll appreciate it!

“If you worried about falling off the bike, you’d never get on.” Lance Armstrong

“Life is like a ten-speed bicycle. Most of us have gears we never use.” Charles M. Schulz

“She who succeeds in gaining mastery of the bicycle will gain the mastery of life.” Susan B. Anthony

Tips to Clean Your Helmet and Shoes

Smell good on your next ride when you clean your helmet and shoes

When was the last time you washed your bike helmet, your bike shoes, and your running shoes? If you haven’t done so in the past month, they probably stink. If you can’t smell it, ask someone else to, then look at their face; the truth comes without words being spoken. Follow the advice below when you clean your helmet and shoes.

THE HELMETImage result for washing cycling helmet

Are the straps white with salt deposits? Are the little pads slippery from sunscreen and hair product? Is the outside stained with grime? I rinse my Rudy Project helmet after almost every ride. It is five years old and still looks brand new.

TO WASH IT

Turn on your kitchen sink and let the water run lukewarm. Run the water on the helmet, the pads, and the strap. Take a tablespoon of shampoo, dish soap, liquid hand soap, or liquid laundry detergent. Rub it between your hands and fingers. Then apply it to all the surfaces that absorb water. Rinse it thoroughly, shake it to get excess water out. Place it in the sun to dry. Wipe the outside with any cleaner like Simple Green or Pedro’s Bike Wash. Stay away from stronger detergents. Any residual that is not rinsed will run into your eyes when you sweat in it again.

RUNNING SHOES

Related image

I train with socks in training shoes and race without socks in flats. A lot of my training is on the bea

ch and if the tide is high, my shoes getwet with salt water (life is tough in La Jolla, CA). So I wash them a lot.

TO WASH THEM

Machine wash them in cold water with some laundry detergent. Wash 4 or 5 pair at a time. When they are done spinning, immediately put them in the sun or dry-room to dry. Believe it or not, most quality running shoes can withstand about 20-30 washes. The midsole and outsole these days are glued so well that they can withstand this sort of care. For most of us that is about a wash a week before it is time to replace the shoes anyway.

BIKE SHOES

I still can’t understand people that train without socks all the time (and I am no Felix Unger). You can do this now and then to simulate a race, okay, but not all the time. Bike shoes are a lot more resilient than I would have imagined first by racing NORBA during a few very wet and muddy seasons, but more recently by doing spinning workouts and indoor stationary bike interval workouts. I have a pair of SIDI Triathlon shoes that I have rinsed and washed with regular shampoo in the shower 100 times and they are still in good condition.

TO WASH THEM

Use the sink again. Get room temperature water, mild detergent, and an old toothbrush. Shampoo works too. Wet the shoes, clean as needed, shake really well, towel dry as much as possible, then set to dry in the sun. If the shoes have leather, saddle soap works well to preserve the softness. I am testing bee’s wax right now on a brand new pair of SIDI Triathlon Shoes so I will report later.

Keep your gear smelling and looking better when you clean your helmet and shoes. This will also reduce the likelihood of acne, infection in the eyes and ears, and promote healthier feet, toes, and toenails.

Emilio De Soto II
Founder/President/Triathlete
De Soto Sport Triathlon Company

Preventing Flat Tires

Use these tips to prevent flat tires

Tired of monkeying around with flat tires? Then check out these prevention tips:
What’s the number one cause of tire problems? If you guessed too little air pressure, then you’re right. Having a good floor pump is essential in helping to prevent flats. The pumps usually include gauges. A good floor pump will inflate tires faster and easier than the pump you carry on your bike for emergencies.

Monitor your tires for wear and tear. Road tires generally last about 1,500 miles when used on the rear and about twice that on the front. If you go any longer than that, flat tires are more likely to occur.

Regularly check your tread for cuts and debris. Outside objects aren’t always the culprit for flat tires. Sometimes the culprit is something sharp inside the rim. If the hole is on the “belly” of the tube (the same surface the valve is on), something inside the rim popped the tube. If the hole is on the outer surface, it was caused by something that penetrated the tire and tube.

For punctures on the tube’s belly, make sure that the rim strip is fully covering the nipple holes and that it can’t move out of position. If you find anything sharp on the rim, sand it smooth with a file or sandpaper.

Dealing with flats

If you follow all these steps and still suffer more than your share of flat tires, there are several additional options available, such as flat-resistant tires, tubes, and tire liners.
These tips are meant to prevent flats and help extend the life of your tires. All cyclists now flat tires are going to happen. If you’re on a ride and you have a flat, memorize these 10 steps for repairing your flat!

My First Real Bike: The One that Started it All

You won’t find many triathletes who can’t remember their first real bike

Some of the High Five Events staff were chatting about bikes the other day during lunch. Then the inevitable happened: we started reminiscing about our first real bike. For some, their first real bike experience took place many years ago. One staff member purchased their first real bike earlier this year. One thing remained constant: everyone remembered their first real bike vividly. Read about our first bikes and their corresponding stories. Let this blog take you down memory lane, conjuring memories of your first real bike. Then share that experience with us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram!

Emily

I got my first real bike (silver Felt ZW) in 2013, two weeks after I registered for my first triathlon, the Rookie Tri! I hadn’t ridden a bike in more than 20 years! Getting used to riding was both scary and exhilarating. I dinged it up pretty good when I fell over at a red light and hit a curb. I forgot my feet were clipped in! Three people got out of their cars to check on me and all I wanted them to do was go away. HA!

Emily's first real bike: silver Felt ZW road bike.

Emily’s silver Felt ZW.

Stacy

My first bike was a Bianchi Giro 105. I got it in 2001 and remember being able to ride in certain parts of Austin that I wouldn’t even consider riding today!

William

Late last year I decided to train for my first triathlon, Rookie Tri. Earlier this year I traveled to Jack and Adam’s Fredericksburg and purchased my first bike, a black FeltZ 100. My first real ride took place on the Veloway. The entire time I kept thinking back to how often we rode bikes as kids. This bike was different that those of my childhood, but the feeling remained the same. Powering your bike, the wind in your face, leaning into turns, it all eventually came back. Now I love riding my bike to work to save on gas and help the environment.

William's first real bike: FeltZ 100.

Fresh off the rack with zero milage.

Tina

My first real bike was black with pink and purple stripes. I remember it came with a huge red bow! It was my first bike with gears and hand brakes. I crashed into a huge agave bush on my first ride and got all scratched up. I’m from Corpus Christi and my family and I would go on rides along the seawall.

Joey

Way back when dinosaurs ruled the Earth… I was just getting started in triathlon and ended up tearing my calf on the run at a race in North Carolina. Prior to that, I was riding a road bike when racing, but I really wanted a tri bike (like the cool). During my recovery I bought a Quintana Roo Kilo as motivation. I counted down the days until I could go out and ride my shiny new toy. 4 QR’s later I still have fond memories of that first race bike. Racing and training with friends led to hundreds of fun miles.

Do you have fond memories of your first real bike? Share your story with us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram.

4 Reasons to Register for Jack’s Generic Triathlon

If you’re on the fence, these 4 reasons will push you to register for JGT

You’ve debated registering for Jack’s Generic Triathlon for some time now. Friends are racing. Your triathlon club will be there.

You plan to register, just haven’t pulled the trigger yet. Why? Perhaps you forgot, maybe it slipped your mind. Every time you think about registering for JGT you’re not near a computer. When you’re near a computer, you forget. It happens. Well, you’re on the computer now. Read the 4 reasons to register for JGT, on August 26th, below and make it happen.

New date, venue, and distance

The Rookie Triathlon - Beginner Triathlon Runner Rookie TriJGT will take place at Walter E. Long Metropolitan Park (aka Decker Lake) on Sunday, August 26th. Previously, the event has taken place at Texas Ski Ranch and Lake Pflugerville. JGT now features the sprint distance only. Aquabike and Relay options are available. The sprint distance will consist of a 600m swim, 11.2-mile bike, and 5K run. Here’s to slightly cooler temperatures at the end of August *quickly knocks on wood*.

Year 16

That’s right, JGT is in its 16th year. There’s a reason people return year after year: they’re more than a number, they’re a barcode. From Day One, JGT has focused on the participant. Sure there have been elites and awesome swag, but the focus consistently remains on you: the athlete. Plus it is fun and clever.

3rd Texas Tri Series event

If you’re taking on the Texas Tri Series then you need to register and complete Jack’s Generic Triathlon. That goes for volunteers too! JGT is the third event in the much-loved series. Triathletes are challenged to participate in or volunteer for four Central Texas triathlons throughout the summer. Many use it as a means to stay active over the summer. Some use it to advance in distance. There are folks out there who just want to challenge themselves. Regardless of why clubs and groups travel from all over to cheer on their athletes as they take on the Texas Tri Series. You can expect a supportive and energetic atmosphere on August 26th.

Sweet, we mean generic, shirt/medal combo

Now that you have this year’s Rookie swag, this combo is perfect for your growing collection. I mean, can you find a better looking shirt/medal duo? We’ll wait… This year’s shirt is perfect for wearing around town or during your post-JGT workouts. And the design is sure to catch everyone’s attention.

The shirt is super-soft and one you’ll gladly add to your collection. The medal matches the shirt and commemorates the accomplishment of crossing the JGT finish line. Make your triathlete friends who don’t race JGT jealous. Or challenge them to join you so they can join in on the fun!

REGISTER!

 

Take the Rookie Tri Quiz

Why You Should Wear Sunglasses When Riding Your Bike

Wearing sunglasses when riding isn’t just for looking cool

In addition to looking hip, wearing sunglasses regularly can have several benefits. This applies to running, hanging at the beach, driving a car, and especially riding your bike. If you have some sweet specs that make you look cool, all the better! We recommend the UA Igniter II Sunglasses by Under Armour. In honor of National #SunglassesDay, we take a look at why wearing shades on your bike ride will protect you and make you safer. Click To Tweet

Protection

  • Dust and debris – You will encounter visible and non-visible projectiles whether you’re riding the trails or commuting to work. Wearing sunglasses to protect your eyes from flying debris might be the most important reason. Flying debris doesn’t care if you’re riding solo or with a group. Cars kick up rocks, bugs are everywhere, even other cyclists can kick up debris on the side of the road. Dust is everywhere. It’s often stirred up by cars, other riders, or Mother Nature. Glasses won’t protect you from all the dust, but it’ll surely help. If you wear shades when riding then you know you have to clean them after every ride.
  • UV exposure – Repeated exposure to UVA and UVB radiation from the sun will have negative consequences on your vision. Protecting your eyes is critical to the short-term, and in this case, the long-term health of your eyes. Make sure your lenses are polarized and have a coating that absorbs the sun’s rays. Lenses also need to be a neutral color, not crazy tints and extreme colors. Your goal is to protect your eyes while replicating what your eyes see naturally.

Safety

  • Clearer view – The correct lenses will help clear your view when cycling. Cyclists have a large amount of information to process when riding. You’re watching for vehicles, intersections, signaling turns, avoiding potholes, tracking other cyclists and runners, the list goes on. Any time you can eliminate distractions you free up the ability to pay attention and process more information. Proper lenses will also help reduce the sun’s glare. Glare could shine in your eyes from street signs, windows on buildings, or the hood’s of cars. Proper fitting sunglasses will also reduce the amount of wind that hits your eyes. Wind alone can cause dryness and irritation when riding.

Next time you’re on the road, grab a pair of sunglasses for your ride. Even a cheap pair will provide protection until you can get a pair that you’ll love. Taking care of your eyes now will pay dividends down the road.

 

4 Motivational Quotes that will Reignite Your Training Flame

These motivational quotes will get you over the hump

It happens to us all. Rookies and Veterans. Young and old. Fast and… not as fast. There isn’t an athlete in this world who has a great race or the perfect workout every single time. Life happens. Kids get sick. Work calls and you have to travel for several days. Weather doesn’t cooperate. FLAT. TIRES. Family obligations. Friends want to go out the night before. The list can go on and on. The bottom line is you need to get past those obstacles. At times it’s simple. Other times it’s not. Give these motivational quotes a read the next time your training hits a bump in the road or you have a bad race.

“Either you run the day or the day runs you.” – Jim Rohn

“If you don’t risk anything you risk even more.” – Erica Jong

“Even if you’re on the right track you’ll get run over if you just sit there.” – Will Rogers

“Start by doing what’s necessary; then do what’s possible; then suddenly you’re doing the impossible.” – Francis of Assisi

8 Post-Race Ways to Stay Motivated to TRI

Our Favorite Ways to stay motivated after a triathlon:

austin triathlon club

Get a coach or training buddy:

Coaches and training friends help you stay accountable. They’ll ask where you were if you don’t show up. You don’t want to let them down or disappoint them with lame excuses. So find some friends to swim, bike or run with! You could also join a club like Austin Duathletes or Austin Tri Club.

Set goals with rewards for achieving them:

One example – get up every day of the week and go on a morning run. Reward yourself with a new pair of sunglasses at the end of the week when you meet the goal. New gear is motivating in itself.

Look at your old race photos:15th Annual Rookie Tri Introduces Hundreds to Triathlon

Reliving the moment can get you back into that place of being high on life. You’ll see how good you looked and remember how good it felt to cross the line. See 2018 Rookie Photos

Dig up your old race shirts and medals:

Pull out your favorite race shirts and finisher medals. While you’re at it, go ahead and put the medal around your neck and do the victory arm raise in the mirror. Relive the moment, then lace up and go for a run! (probably leave the medal behind.)

Go watch or volunteer at a tri:

Nothing is more motivating than being on the sidelines. Seeing the physical capabilities and watching athlete muscles work is inspiring. So next time you feel less than motivated, go watch others and cheer or volunteer. Check out volunteer positions at Jack’s Generic Tri on Aug 26, 2018

beautiful course kerrville ad 2017Enter another race:

Entering a race and putting money into it will help get your foot out the door when you don’t feel like it. You don’t want to waste that money! Plus, if you let everyone know you signed up, then you MUST keep your training going. The Rookie Tri is part of the Texas Tri Series. There are 2 more awesome race in 2018, check them out.

Music:

If you don’t have time to catch up on new music or listen to your old faves, then remember a great time to do so is on a run or ride. Great music is a fun way to get yourself out the door.

Apple watch:

Why is it that closing rings and getting virtual awards is so addicting? It’s silly, but it works! If you have 27 days of your exercise goals, do you want to continue to 28 or let it die? Of course, you want to go for 28! So if you have an Apple Watch, be sure to utilize this feature.

While you’re out there – keep in mind that not everyone is physically able to do what you’re doing. Whether it be from a terminal illness, injury or physical handicap, many of these people would give anything to be in your shoes. So, stay motivated and do it for them!