Removing and Replacing Pedals

Learn about properly removing and replacing your pedals

This task sounds really easy (but isn’t always). Removing or replacing pedals is one of the bike maintenance projects that most will attempt at one time or another. Reasons for removing or replacing pedals include traveling for an event like Rookie Triathlon (in which your pedals need to be removed), buying new clip-in pedals, and just general bike care.

Tools and supplies needed:

Pedal wrench – a normal adjustable wrench will work, but a pedal wrench will help you protect the pedal and provide more leverage for stubborn pedals.

Grease – used to re-grease the pedal threads if dry.

Set of Allen wrenches – some pedals are not compatible with pedal wrenches and require the use of a 5, 6, or 8mm Allen wrench from the inside tip of the spindle.

TIPS

The first thing to know is that the left pedal is reverse threaded. This means that the right one is “righty tighty” and “lefty loosey.” The left one is the opposite. Viewing from atop the bike, both pedals thread in the direction the bike moves forward. This design is to prevent the pedals from coming off as you pedal forward.

The second thing to know is that pedals are right and left specific. They are usually marked with a small R or L.

Leave the wheels on the bike. This stabilizes the bike for stubborn pedals.

If you ever notice that the threads are dry, add a little grease. Do this once every six months and on every set of new pedals you buy.

STEPS

The best position for taking pedals off is to stand over the bike with the crank arm that has the pedal you are taking off facing straight forward. Attach the pedal wrench so that it is facing straight back. Hold on to the reverse side crank arm with your free hand and press down on the wrench. This is the easiest way to remove pedals.

When replacing pedals, always use your fingers to start the threading process to prevent stripping the pedal threads. When tightening, make sure that both pedals are snug. They do not need to be so tight that you may have trouble removing.

Secure Your Bike and Protect it from Unwanted Riders

Properly secure your bike and make sure it stays yours

Just about everyone transports their bike from home to wherever they ride. So what do you do with your bike when you stop at a convenience store to get a drink? What if you make a quick stop on the way home to grab dinner? You should lock and secure your bike on your rack so that someone does not “borrow” your bike. After all, you worked so hard to buy! Pro tip: it never hurts to double-check that your lock is actually locked.

If you have a roof rack chances are that you have locks built into your rack. Otherwise, you can easily get them from a shop that sells your brand of rack. If you do not have locks or you have a rear rack for your car, then you can use a cable lock to secure your bike to your car.

Anytime you lock your #bike, you should run the cable through the frame of the bike and your wheels as well. Click To Tweet

Always secure your bike

Anytime you lock your bike, you should run the cable through the frame of the bike and your wheels as well. This also goes for locking your bike to a bike rack if you are commuting. This increases the likelihood that your wheels won’t disappear from your bike. These additional tips will also come in handy when you secure your bike.

Remember: anything that can come off of your bike without tools (wheels, saddlebag, seat post on mountain bikes) someone else can take off as well.

One last thing to remember is that locking your bike is a deterrent. If someone really wants it and they have a little time, they will get your bike. Lock your bike in plain sight so people can see it. Try not to leave it outside for long periods of time. Being proactive in protecting your bike will go a long way in ensuring it remains right where you left it. Make sure you secure your bike every time you’re away from it, even if it’s for a few minutes.